Revision of Last Month's ideas

Peter Poteralski and Mojave

Peter Poteralski and getting the most from Internet connections

John Rozbah and the happy pet app

 

Consumer protection

Consumer guarantees

(https://www.accc.gov.au/consumers/consumer-rights-guarantees/consumer-guarantees#what-products-and-services-are-guaranteed)

Warrantees

(https://www.accc.gov.au/consumers/consumer-rights-guarantees/warranties)

If you need to make a complaint -

The Check-out team have made an amusing but pretty useful video to help with complaints:

see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3PGHCFDdPc&list=PLcnP8uT1FzoXfKYE-8VWEO5L-cyiFnQat&index=31&t=0s

What is mine?

Open source

An open-source license is a type of license for computer software and other products that allows the source code, blueprint or design to be used, modified and/or shared under defined terms and conditions.[1][2] This allows end users and commercial companies to review and modify the source code, blueprint or design for their own customization, curiosity or troubleshooting needs. Open-source licensed software is mostly available free of charge, though this does not necessarily have to be the case. Licenses which only permit non-commercial redistribution or modification of the source code for personal use only are generally not considered as open-source licenses. However, open-source licenses may have some restrictions, particularly regarding the expression of respect to the origin of software, such as a requirement to preserve the name of the authors and a copyright statement within the code, or a requirement to redistribute the licensed software only under the same license (as in a copyleft license). One popular set of open-source software licenses are those approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI) based on their Open Source Definition (OSD).

Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open-source_license

Public domain

The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply. Those rights may have expired, been forfeited, expressly waived, or may be inapplicable.

Wikipedia - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_domain

Creative Commons

Creative Commons helps you legally share your knowledge and creativity to build a more equitable, accessible, and innovative world. With a network of staff, board, and affiliates around the world, Creative Commons provides free, easy-to-use copyright licenses to make a simple and standardized way to give the public permission to share and use your creative work–on conditions of your choice.

See https://creativecommons.org/

Free Software Foundation

The Free Software Foundation has related but distinct criteria for evaluating whether or not a license qualifies software as free software. Most free software licenses are also considered open-source software licenses. In the same way, the Debian project has its own criteria, the Debian Free Software Guidelines, on which the Open Source Definition is based. In the interpretation of the FSF, open-source license criteria focus on the availability of the source code and the ability to modify and share it, while free software licenses focuses on the user's freedom to use the program, to modify it, and to share it.

Source-available licenses ensure source code availability, but do not necessarily meet the user freedom criteria to be classified as free software or open-source software.

See https://www.fsf.org/